Glose

A Glose opens with a quotation from another author as an epigraph. The number of lines in the epigraph determines the number of stanzas and the length of the stanzas in the poem. If the epigraph has four lines, then your poem will be four stanzas of four lines apiece. And line one of the first stanza would quote line one of the epigraph; line two of the second stanza would quote line two of the epigraph and so forth.

“You have to write the book that wants to be written.
And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups,
then you write it for children.”
― Madeleine L’Engle

“You have to write the book that wants to be written.”
If it flies in the night yelling at trees,
then you write about flying in the night yelling at trees.

If the trees yell back,
“And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups,”
then stop procrastinating and start flying, its already dusk…

grown-ups don’t yell at trees, unless they are writers…
but only poets hear what the trees yell back, but no one would believe that book…
“then you write it for children.”

Here is another one from a haiku by Chiyo-Ni:

“moonlit night
out on the stone
a cricket singing”

“moonlit night”
the wind makes wings
of my jacket

then a white bird
“out on the stone”
takes flight

its shadow
on the ground
“a cricket singing”

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